WordRake To Assist In The New Rule For Appellate Word Count

1it enterprise

1it enterpriseLast year Federal appellate briefs were been limited to 13,000 words, around 52 pages by the Advisory Committee on Rules of Appellate Procedure. The main intention of this limitation is to reduce the workload of appellate court judges. Earlier litigants were allowed for a 14,000 word appellate brief. In reply, WordRake has rolled out a set of changes to its text-editing tool, WordRake 3, ahead of the scheduled enactment date of a rule limiting the word counts of federal appellate briefs i.e. December 1. Scan full documents to suggest alterations or cuts to pointless or feeble language is the target of the new update for the tool. The update also promises greater strength of recommended edits and better accuracy as well. The fresh law has drawn inquiry across the board, most newly from the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers, which disparaged the policy as needless and unethically detrimental principally intricate issues.

 

Gary Kinder WordRake founder said that throughout his time as a writing coach for Big Law advocates, he saw advocates try a number of walk around to past offers setting caps on page counts, which were equally intentional to simplify information for courts. People find all kind of different ways such as 1.5 line spacing instead of 2.0 and use smaller fonts in order to cheat he added.