Microsoft’s nasty new pop-up trick

Microsoft's nasty new pop-up trickMicrosoft recently implemented a new game plan to make its users upgrade to Windows 10. Even though free of cost some users are simply not interested for the same.

In December, the Get Windows 10 (GWX) pop-up changed its verbiage in a way that mimicked malware. The only immediate options were to “Upgrade Now” or “Start download, upgrade later.” An offer you can’t refuse! The wording changed slightly since then, but the only way to decline the upgrade has been the same: By clicking the X button in the GWX pop-up’s right-hand corner and closing the window.Earlier this year, however, Microsoft pushed the Windows 10 download out as a recommended update. That means anybody using the default Windows Update setting as you should be, automatically received the installation bits and a prompt to install the new OS. That’s nasty enough, and spawned a wave of complaints about unprovoked auto-upgrades, but a new change goes even further.

Last week, Microsoft altered the GWX prompt. On the surface, it’s an improvement the box clearly states when your PC will be upgraded, and even adds a still small line that users can often skip which allows you to reschedule or change the upgrade timing. But here’s the tricky part: The redesigned GWX pop-up now treats exiting the window as consent for the Windows 10 upgrade.

So after more than half a year of teaching people that the only way to say “No thanks” to Windows 10 is to exit the GWX application—and refusing to allow users to disable the pop-up in any obvious manner, so they had to press that X over and over again during those six months to the point that most people probably just click it without reading now—Microsoft just made it so that very behavior accepts the Windows 10 upgrade instead.

PC users are already up in arms over it, and rightfully so. By now, every existing Windows 7 and 8 user has seen and declined the Windows 10 update numerous times. By forcing out Windows 10 as a recommended update and changing the behavior associated with exiting the GWX pop-up, Microsoft’s actively striving to push the operating system on people who actively don’t want it.

Worse of all  these under-handed tactics are encouraging Windows 7 and 8 users to disable Windows Updates all together, which leaves their systems more vulnerable to attackers who exploit security flaws