Groundbreaking 10 TB Storage In 1 Cm

Groundbreaking 10 TB Storage In 1 CmImagine a space so small that it can barely fit the tip of the thumb and has the capacity to store 10 TB data. Yes, you read it right, a team of physicist from Delft University of Technology (DUT) of Netherland led by Sander Otte has used Chlorine atoms to manufacture a device which when might hold 10 terabytes of data. The device has an area of barely 1cm. As of now, the device can hold 1 KB by arranging Chlorine atoms in a square grid on a copper surface.

The idea is to move atoms around the surface. The device built at Delft has a few blank space where physicists can push atoms in order to switch from ones and zeros. To store 1 bit of data one chlorine atom and 1 blank space is required, and one line on the grid can store 1 byte of data.

The device is presently in development stage a proof of principle. It needs to be kept in -198 degree Celsius. The researchers have faith that if a 3-D structure can be built to the size of a grain of sugar from chlorine atoms it might hold hundreds of terabytes of data and also can be used as a cloud.

This device that DUT created is the newest assembly of atoms ever created. Companies like Microsoft has been researching on this type of high-density data storage models. Earlier this month the company announced a 200 MB data storage on a single DNA strand.